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Sundance Film Festival 2022 Night 1


There is a scene within the first half of The Worst Person in the World where the lead of the film (the incredible Renate Reinsve) unknowingly is walking between two very important chapters in her life (not necessarily the literal chapters in the film, but quite possibly so - as they are used impeccably to this viewer’s delight). In this moment, it is in the brilliance of the filmmaking and the lead actor’s internal work that the viewer sees so many questions, feelings, emotions and choices go across the beautiful and open artist’s canvas of her own face used in such a way so as to floor the viewer in its simplicity. It is not the showiest scene in the film (although that scene is incredible and a real showstopper), it is not one where ideas and feelings are expressed, but it is the haunting moment where we see the whole person, on her own, looking at her life, and weighing all of her options in this time that she is in. I, for one, (and for anyone that doesn’t know, I pretty much cry in every film), was crying and the most moved in this scene, more than any in the rest of the film. There are laughs, heartache, raw humanity and swooning swaths of beauty throughout, but this particular scene took my breath away because of its simplicity of choice. Our lives are incredibly complex, and nobody else may understand why we do what we do, but ultimately our lives are our own, and we have to forge ahead, whether or not anyone else understands. The beauty is often in the most honest, raw, and painful moments where we are left alone to ponder what we are doing with our lives and think of the choices that have led us there, but also know that our lives are ours alone, to do with what we can and ultimately, what we must.


From January 21st, 2022


#theworstpersonintheworld #sundancefilmfestival #film #filmfestival #filmthoughts #filmreviews


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